Can Cats Eat Almonds?

 

Can Cats Eat Almonds? After writing two other articles to see if cats can eat honey and if cats can eat bacon, I started wondering. What other foods are safe and or unsafe for cats? Which leads us into the next topic, after almonds safe for cats?

Nuts are known for being extremely healthy for humans and provide a great source of fats for our diets. Almonds are the most of the nuts, they can be served in many different ways. We love to eat almonds, salted, roasted or mixed with raisins and chocolate. They can also be added to smoothies and salads

Today, there is even almond flour, almond butter and almond milk that have also increased in popularity. These are actually becoming three staples of my diet recently, especially almond milk.

Almonds and Cats:

What about cats? Are almonds just as healthy and nutritious for cats as they are for humans? And what health benefits, if any, do almonds have for your cat? Are almonds safe or poisonous to your cat?

If your cats are anything like my kittens, they probably have had curiosity around anything you are eating. And if you are like me, you want to cave and give them scraps from time to time. Before I give into the cuties and give them my food, I always make sure that the food is safe and healthy for them to eat.

Cats Are Carnivores

So let’s answer the big question, can cats eat almonds? Unfortunately, most of the minerals and vitamins from almonds that make them so healthy for us, are not useful to cats. Cats are known carnivores just like I mentioned in the post, can cats eat bacon? Which is why most of the cat food cans are all meat and gravy.

As such, the only food they truly benefit from is meat.   In the wild, cats were trained to live on meat, and meat only. Cats cannot synthesize most of the amino acids that the human digestive system can. In addition to this, in order to benefit from vitamin A, they need to acquire it in its preformed state as they do not have the necessary ‘tools’ to create it from beta-carotene. Which is the technical speak for, cats don’t use the micronutrients the same way we do. Vegan cats will probably not be a thing anytime soon.

Health Risks with Almonds

Unfortunately, on top of not gaining much from almonds, there are also several downsides to feeding almonds to your cat on a regular basis. At the very top of the things you should be worried about is cyanide poisoning.

If you guys are like me and only know cyanide from action movies, you are probably thinking I am crazy. I may be, but not about this. Almonds contain cyanogenic glycosides which is a natural toxin. (Maybe these superfoods are really not all that super after all!).

This natural toxin is also present in apple seeds, peach pits and cherries. Thankfully, in low levels, the toxin is practically harmless.

But when consumed in high amounts, your cat can suffer from cyanide poisoning. And since your cat is much smaller than you, a normal amount to you could be an extremely high amount on cats. Symptoms of cyanide poisoning include upset stomach, dilated pupils and increased breathing.  In some serious cases, your cat could even go into shock and die. 

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Why Almonds are Bad For Cats

Not all cats experience cyanide poisoning, and if you notice your cat eating one almond, it’s not something you should rush to the emergency vet for. However, you should keep a watchful eye over your cat when you give it some almonds.  

Our feline friends can also get stomach aches as a result of the fats present in almonds. Interestingly enough, plant fat has a different composition from animal fat and your cat may have a hard time digesting it. If your kitty has a hard time digesting the fats and they accumulate in the body, your cat may develop pancreatitis.

Chocolate Covered Almonds

Some of human’s favorite ways to consume chocolate is with lots of toppings. The most popular of the toppings includes chocolate. An important callout hopefully you already know. Chocolate is toxic for your cat. If the almonds have chocolate toppings, do not dare feed them to your cat – the situation will not end well. There is no ‘okay in small amounts’ talk when it comes to chocolate people!

My thoughts would be, if there are any sort of toppings on the almonds, they stay away from the kitties.

 What about Almond Milk?

Generally, your cat can have almond milk. (THANK GOODNESS!) Before I started researching this, I would give my kittens the leftover almond milk after I was done with cereal. There wasn’t ever really much, but when I started writing about this, I felt like a

Can Your Cat Eat Almonds? #cats #catfood

hypocrite.

For me, the rational I had for almond milk was it was not considered a dairy product. This means that there is no lactose which most cats seem to have an intolerance for. In addition, almond milk does not contain any ingredient that is labeled as toxic to cats. And, cats love its taste.

This is definitely a treat your cat is bound to enjoy.   Remember, almond milk, should be served in moderation. If you are introducing your cat to it, be sure to monitor its reaction. And before you start, make sure you know what you are getting yourself into. I gave the kittens almond milk ONCE, and now I don’t get to eat cereal in peace anymore. That’s probably more of a training factor, but it’

s just a fair warning I like to throw in.

Conclusion.

Can cats eat almonds? The simple answer is yes, but in moderation and with the watchful eye of their humans. Should cats eat almonds? Personally, I keep them away from my cats, unless one falls on the floor while making lunches. I personally don’t want to risk not knowing the “right” amount and stressing about possible cyanide poisoning. To me, this is not a food to share with your furry friends.

Actually, the idea of “natural” toxins doesn’t really ring all that well with me even eating it. I understand why they say to eat them in moderation now. But, you love your little cat baby and you don’t want anything bad to happen to them. In my personal opinion, I would keep almonds away from your cat period. Better safe than sorry.

 

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